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From the Experts at Credit.com

What Happens to Your Credit When You Get Married?

October 17, 2013

Marriage Myths

What happens to your credit reports and credit scores when you get married? There are all kinds of common misconceptions about merging reports and falling credit scores. Luckily, these myths aren't true. Here are the five most common marriage and money myths:

1. Our credit reports will merge together when we get married

This is probably the most common marriage myth. Credit reports are keyed off each person's individual Social Security number. Since your Social Security numbers don't merge together into one number when you get married, neither do your credit histories.

2. Marriage will lower my credit scores

Huge amounts of credit card debt from funding your wedding and your honeymoon may harm your credit scores, but the act of getting married will not. Nothing automatically changes on your credit reports when you get married, so nothing should impact your credit scores.

3. When I change my last name, my credit history is erased

If you change your name after you are married and report this change to your creditors, you will see some updates to your existing credit reports. Along with your old name, your new name will be listed as an alias. You will not have to start from scratch with a new credit history. There may be a few inaccuracies on your report as this transition takes place, so it's important to check your credit report frequently during this period.

4. My spouse's poor credit will hurt my credit scores

This is a common concern for couples about to get married. Fortunately, your spouse's past credit history has no impact on your credit profile. Only when you open a joint account will any information be shared on both of your credit reports. However, when you want to buy a home together, your spouse's negative credit history could impact your mortgage rates. You should work together to improve your sweetheart's credit if you are planning for a major purchase.

5. I will automatically become a joint user on my spouse's accounts

Marriage doesn't automatically make you an authorized user or co-signer on your spouse's accounts. If you wish to be added to your spouse's credit cards, you will need to call the creditors with this request. Please note that being added as an authorized user will not result in the account being factored into your credit score. As for loan accounts, becoming a co-signer for a loan usually requires refinancing.

Congratulations on your marriage! Now that you don't have to worry about these common marriage myths, you can spend more time enjoying being newlyweds!


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