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Brian O'Connell

In Identity Theft and Scams, Personal Finance

Credit.com contributor, Brian is an author who’s placed two finance/investment titles in “The Book of the Month Club” and he’s a business writer whose byline has appeared in dozens of top-tier national publications, including The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, The Street.com, Yahoo Finance, CBS Marketwatch, and many more.

Freedom of Speech or ID Theft?

Identity Theft and Scams

Freedom of Speech or ID Theft?

Freedom of Speech or ID Theft?

A Utah District Court ruling may have big ramifications on whether free speech can cross the line over to identity theft. The case, which involves a media hoax against a major U.S. company by an environmental group, may lean on what the definition of a “prank” is – and whether it can actually be described... Read More

Facebook Scams: Social Networking Breaches Doubled in 2010

Identity Theft and Scams

Facebook Scams: Social Networking Breaches Doubled in 2010

Facebook Scams: Social Networking Breaches Doubled in 2010

Let’s go ahead and call 2010 the “Year of the Facebook Scam.” That after a new study from information technology and control firm Sophos , which says social networking users — especially Facebook fanatics — are ‘sitting ducks” for cyber thieves. [Related: A Thank You Letter to Facebook (From A Privacy Advocate] The 2011 Sophos... Read More

Reading the Junk Mail Could Prevent Credit Card Fraud

Identity Theft and Scams

Reading the Junk Mail Could Prevent Credit Card Fraud

Reading the Junk Mail Could Prevent Credit Card Fraud

Don’t throw out that junk mail after your daily trip to the mailbox – a quick check could reveal an identity theft crime committed against you. One way thieves can hit you is by using credit card confirmations with your card number – but somebody else’s name. ID criminals are counting on the fact that... Read More

New Study: Corporate Fraud In Decline

Identity Theft and Scams

New Study: Corporate Fraud In Decline

New Study: Corporate Fraud In Decline

A study of 12 million employees around the globe reports that corporate fraud is down for the third quarter of 2010 – after three years of surprisingly high growth. The study is called the Quarterly Corporate Fraud Index, and is conducted every quarter by two companies – The Network, Inc. and BDO Consulting. The most... Read More

College Student too Lazy to Pay Loan? Ohio Court Thinks So

Student Loans

College Student too Lazy to Pay Loan? Ohio Court Thinks So

College Student too Lazy to Pay Loan? Ohio Court Thinks So

It’s one thing not to pay your student loan. It’s quite another not to pay it, and have your character called into question in a court of law. But that’s exactly what happened to an Ohio State University law school grad, who in the eyes of the Ohio Supreme Court doesn’t possess “the character and... Read More

IRS Warns of Phony Agents

Identity Theft and Scams

IRS Warns of Phony Agents

IRS Warns of Phony Agents

Impersonating an IRS agent may not be at the top of the list of smart moves people make, but that doesn’t mean it’s not happening. The IRS is out with a warning to consumers to be on the watch for con artists that say they’re with the agency, and accept tax payments in its name.... Read More

Credit Card Usage Drops – Is Debit the New Credit?

News

Credit Card Usage Drops – Is Debit the New Credit?

Credit Card Usage Drops – Is Debit the New Credit?

No doubt about it, the 2010 holiday shopping season was all boom and no bust. That’s particularly true of online shoppers, who poured billions into retail coffers during the November-December shopping period. According to comScore, U.S. consumers spent $32.6 billion during the holiday shopping season, a 12% hike over 2009,  an “all-time record for the... Read More

Better Business Bureau Lists Top Ten Scams

Personal Finance

Better Business Bureau Lists Top Ten Scams

Better Business Bureau Lists Top Ten Scams

It’s no secret. If you don’t protect yourself from potential fraudsters, you’re asking for trouble. Identity thieves are coming up with new, crafty ways to separate you from your identity – and your money. To highlight some of the most popular scams consumer scam artists are turning to these days, the Better Business Bureau has... Read More

Credit Cards and “Temporary” Account Numbers

Credit Cards

Credit Cards and “Temporary” Account Numbers

Credit Cards and “Temporary” Account Numbers

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see card agreements. Disclosure: Our partners are mentioned below.] Did you know that you can use a “temporary” account number when using your credit card online? You can, and more consumers are using such numbers to better protect their personal financial identity while... Read More

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