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Farnoosh Torabi

In Student Loans, Personal Finance

Farnoosh Torabi is a nationally recognized author, expert and television host. Her first book, You’re So Money, is an acclaimed tell-all for young adults searching for financial independence. Her new book Psych Yourself Rich, gives readers the mindset and discipline to build their financial life.

Are Prepaid Cards Worth It?

Credit Cards

Are Prepaid Cards Worth It?

Are Prepaid Cards Worth It?

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see card agreements. Disclosure: Cards from our partners are mentioned below.] I’ve never been a big fan of prepaid cards, as many charge exorbitant fees from monthly maintenance to reloading fees. But with such rapid growth in the industry, this category of... Read More

Study: Student Debt Buys Self-Confidence

Student Loans

Study: Student Debt Buys Self-Confidence

Study: Student Debt Buys Self-Confidence

When I was 22, I’d yet to conquer “needs versus wants” and was living beyond my means.  My monthly credit card statement was often a source of anxiety and regret. But young adults today don’t quite harbor the same emotions when it comes to debt. A new study suggests the more credit card debt and... Read More

Top 10 Hyper-Specific Groupon Wannabes

Personal Finance

Top 10 Hyper-Specific Groupon Wannabes

Top 10 Hyper-Specific Groupon Wannabes

The soon-to-go-public daily deal website, Groupon, has, in just a couple of years, transformed the way we save money on discretionary things from pizza to Pilates. Following in Groupon’s footsteps—and hoping to snag some of the explosive daily deal market share—similar, but niche websites are cropping up.  Like Groupon, they offer exclusive daily deals, but... Read More

Wedding Etiquette: 3 Ways to Request Cash

Personal Finance

Wedding Etiquette: 3 Ways to Request Cash

Wedding Etiquette: 3 Ways to Request Cash

While a bread maker or espresso machine are great gifts for a newly married couple, let’s be honest: there’s nothing quite like the gift of cash (or checks!). Cash provides options. It pays bills. It settles debt. It can contribute towards a new car or home, all things that ultimately trump an upright vacuum or... Read More

Manage Student Loans With Your Smart Phone? Eh.

Student Loans

Manage Student Loans With Your Smart Phone? Eh.

Manage Student Loans With Your Smart Phone? Eh.

There are some great mobile apps and phone-friendly websites sites that help us better manage our money and credit, many of which I’ve written about for Credit.com. But I’m not convinced a new mobile service intended to help borrowers manage their student loans is really going to help stem the growing rate of student loan... Read More

Top 5 Store Credit Cards

Credit Cards

Top 5 Store Credit Cards

Top 5 Store Credit Cards

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see card agreements. Disclosure: Cards from our partners are mentioned below.] In general, I’m not a huge advocate for store credit cards. They tend to carry higher than average interest rates and low credit limits. Run wild with these cards and your... Read More

Survey Finds Strategic Defaulters Have Good Credit

Mortgages

Survey Finds Strategic Defaulters Have Good Credit

Survey Finds Strategic Defaulters Have Good Credit

The debate over strategic default— when a homeowner with the ability to afford his mortgage decides to stop paying because his home is worth less than the loan—has largely been one of ethics. Is it morally right to walk away from a legal contract such as a mortgage? Immoral or not, new data suggests that those... Read More

Get Out of Minimum Payment Hell

Managing Debt

Get Out of Minimum Payment Hell

Get Out of Minimum Payment Hell

We’ve all heard by now that paying the minimum on your credit card is one of the biggest financial traps. It could take decades to pay down a balance simply because you’re paying the credit card company’s suggested monthly minimum. That’s why Congress recently decided to force card issuers to include an explanation on each... Read More

5 Things Not to Buy at the Dollar Store

Personal Finance

5 Things Not to Buy at the Dollar Store

5 Things Not to Buy at the Dollar Store

This weekend, the San Diego Union-Tribune had an interesting story on the success of dollar stores in this economy where everyone’s looking for a deal. Dollar store stocks have been outpacing the market, giving Walmart and other giant retailers a run for their money. And while it’s true that these stores can be fantastic places... Read More

Boost College Retention With Financial Literacy

Student Loans

Boost College Retention With Financial Literacy

Boost College Retention With Financial Literacy

Student success starts with financial literacy. That was the message I shared with more than a hundred college instructors in Las Vegas this past weekend at the Pearson Student Success National Forum, hosted by my publishing team at Pearson Higher Education. As students grapple with the rising cost of tuition, many colleges are struggling with... Read More

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