Can I Sue a Company for Sending Me to Collections?

It happens. A collections notice shows up, a debt collector starts calling or you find a negative report on your credit history, but you know you paid the account in question. Can you sue a company for sending you to collections for money you didn’t owe? Find out more about what the law says about your rights when it comes to protecting your credit history.

How Does the Law Protect Your Rights Regarding Credit Collections and Reporting?

Numerous federal and state laws protect your rights to fair and accurate credit reporting. Some of those laws also cover your rights as a consumer to fair debt collection practices. A few of the laws that might come into play are as follows:

Credit law can be complex. If you’re not sure which laws cover you or what the best course of action is in your case, you might need to consult with an attorney.

    Call now for a FREE consultation
    CALL 844-639-6956

    Can You Sue a Company for Sending You to Collections?

    Yes, the FDCPA allows for legal action against certain collectors that don’t comply with the rules in the law. If you’re sent to collections for a debt you don’t owe or a collector otherwise ignores the FDCPA, you might be able to sue that collector.

    It’s a good idea to do everything you can under the law to protect your rights before you sue. That might include requesting validation of any debt within 30 days of receiving the first notice, for example. But even without that action, the collector can still be liable if it breaks the law.

    According to the FDCPA, civil liabilities are limited to the amount of damages actually experienced plus any additional damages awarded by the court. Those additional damages are limited to $1,000 in individual cases and $500,000 in class action suits.

      Get everything you need to master your credit today.
      Get started for free

      Can You Sue a Company for False Credit Reporting?

      Yes, you might be able to sue a company for false credit reporting. However, before you seek a civil remedy through the courts, you should properly exercise your rights under the law.

      Begin by challenging the information with the credit bureau. False information hits credit reports for a variety of reasons, including misunderstandings and honest mistakes such as clerical errors. When you sent a credit dispute letter, the bureau must investigate and respond within a time frame dictated by the regulation.

      The investigation typically involves contacting the reporting creditor or collection agency. That entity is given a chance to demonstrate the information is accurate via appropriate documentation. If the credit bureau determines the information is inaccurate or can’t be proven, it typically removes or corrects it.

      The Fair Credit Reporting Act lists civil penalties for people or businesses that willfully refuse to comply with accurate credit reporting. Actual damages are limited to a range of $100 to $1,000. You might also be able to recover attorney’s fees and additional punitive damages the court can award on a case-by-case basis. Punitive damages are those awarded as a type of punishment for the person or business engaged in wrongdoing.

      Features of ExtraCredit

      Coronavirus Impact on Credit Reporting and Your Rights

      The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act of 2020 (CARES Act) made some temporary modifications to creditors’ legal requirements for reporting. For example, it requires creditors to report accounts as current in certain situations where forbearances were granted.

      Forbearance means the creditor agrees you don’t have to pay the loan for a certain period of time. During that time, you won’t be penalized by having the account reported as late.

      If you think your collection or credit reporting issue should be be protected under the CARES Act, consider consulting a lawyer. One can help you understand your rights, which laws affect them and any action you might take next.

      How Do You Sue a Collection Agency or Other Creditor?

      We’re not legal experts at Credit.com, so we can’t give legal advice. We’ve provided a good amount of information to help you understand your rights under the law. But if you think suing a debt collector or other creditor is the next best step, consult an attorney.

      A legal professional can help you understand if you have a claim against your creditor, for example. That person might also be able to advise you about other options, including debt settlement, if you do owe any money.

      If you ended up here because you just discovered inaccurate information on your report, consider credit repair services from providers such as Lexington Law or CreditRepair.com. And if you have no idea what’s on your credit report, consider signing up for a service such as ExtraCredit to stay as informed as possible.

      Disclosure: Credit.com and CreditRepair.com are both owned by the same company, Progrexion Holdings Inc. John C Heath, Attorney at Law, PC, d/b/a Lexington Law Firm is an independent law firm that uses Progrexion as a provider of business and administrative services.]

        Get everything you need to master your credit today.
        Get started for free

        Credit.com receives compensation for the financial products and services advertised on this site if our users apply for and sign up for any of them. Compensation is not a factor in the substantive evaluation of any product.

        Hello, Reader!

        Thanks for checking out Credit.com. We hope you find the site and the journalism we produce useful. We wanted to take some time to tell you a bit about ourselves.

        Our People

        The Credit.com editorial team is staffed by a team of editors and reporters, each with many years of financial reporting experience. We’ve worked for places like the New York Times, American Banker, Frontline, TheStreet.com, Business Insider, ABC News, NBC News, CNBC and many others. We also employ a few freelancers and more than 50 contributors (these are typically subject matter experts from the worlds of finance, academia, politics, business and elsewhere).

        Our Reporting

        We take great pains to ensure that the articles, video and graphics you see on Credit.com are thoroughly reported and fact-checked. Each story is read by two separate editors, and we adhere to the highest editorial standards. We’re not perfect, however, and if you see something that you think is wrong, please email us at editorial team [at] credit [dot] com,

        The Credit.com editorial team is committed to providing our readers and viewers with sound, well-reported and understandable information designed to inform and empower. We won’t tell you what to do. We will, however, do our best to explain the consequences of various actions, thereby arming you with the information you need to make decisions that are in your best interests. We also write about things relating to money and finance we think are interesting and want to share.

        In addition to appearing on Credit.com, our articles are syndicated to dozens of other news sites. We have more than 100 partners, including MSN, ABC News, CBS News, Yahoo, Marketwatch, Scripps, Money Magazine and many others. This network operates similarly to the Associated Press or Reuters, except we focus almost exclusively on issues relating to personal finance. These are not advertorial or paid placements, rather we provide these articles to our partners in most cases for free. These relationships create more awareness of Credit.com in general and they result in more traffic to us as well.

        Our Business Model

        Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.

        Visitors to Credit.com are also able to register for a free Credit.com account, which gives them access to a tool called The Credit Report Card. This tool provides users with two free credit scores and a breakdown of the information in their Experian credit report, updated twice monthly. Again, this tool is entirely free, and we mention that frequently in our articles, because we think that it’s a good thing for users to have access to data like this. Separate from its educational value, there is also a business angle to the Credit Report Card. Registered users can be matched with products and services for which they are most likely to qualify. In other words, if you register and you find that your credit is less than stellar, Credit.com won’t recommend a high-end platinum credit card that requires an excellent credit score You’d likely get rejected, and that’s no good for you or Credit.com. You’d be no closer to getting a product you need, there’d be a wasted inquiry on your credit report, and Credit.com wouldn’t get paid. These are essentially what are commonly referred to as "targeted ads" in the world of the Internet. Despite all of this, however, even if you never apply for any product, the Credit Report Card will remain free, and none of this will impact how the editorial team reports on credit and credit scores.



        Your Stories

        Lastly, much of what we do is informed by our own experiences as well as the experiences of our readers. We want to tell your stories if you’re interested in sharing them. Please email us at story ideas [at] credit [dot] com with ideas or visit us on Facebook or Twitter.

        Thanks for stopping by.

        - The Credit.com Editorial Team