Sign up for your free Credit.com account    Sign Up Now
From the Experts at Credit.com

What is VantageScore?

Anatomy of a VantageScore Credit Score

VantageScore first exploded on the credit score scene in 2006 as a joint venture of the big three credit bureaus – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – and now has the distinction of being one of only two scoring models, the other being FICO, to be relied upon by lenders in their lending decisions. VantageScore currently claims about 10 percent of this hard-to-crack market for credit scores used in the lending industry, with the greatest adoption seen in the largest banks and lenders.

Banks and lenders use the VantageScore

Who Uses The VantageScore: Nearly one billion VantageScore credit scores were used last year by over 2,000 lenders and other industry participants, including 6 of the 10 largest banks. In fact, over 3 billion VantageScore credit scores were pulled in the last year, including scores used for decisioning, model building, and testing purposes. Source: www.vantagescore.com

Like other credit scores, VantageScore consists of calculations relying entirely on credit bureau information – not income, bank accounts or other assets – to predict how likely you are to pay your credit obligations on time each month. With an emphasis on paying on time, keeping balances low, and avoiding new credit obligations, the simplicity and common-sensibility of credit scores are often marred by the all-too-frequent credit reporting errors that can lead to credit scoring errors, and that can require active management of your credit – much like managing your health.

Introducing VantageScore 3.0

Introduced in March of 2013, and shortly thereafter provided by Credit.com as part of its free Credit Report Card, VantageScore 3.0 brings some new consumer-friendly features to the table, while at the same time providing lenders with up to a 25 percent predictive improvement over earlier models.

What are the Advantages of VantageScore 3.0?

Without a doubt, the most radical feature of VantageScore 3.0 is its ability to calculate a score for 30 to 35 million previously “unscoreable,” or “thin file,” consumers. While many other scoring models require at least six months of credit history and recent credit report updates, VantageScore only requires one month of credit history and less frequent updates. Credit can now be made available to consumers who are brand new to credit, those who only use credit occasionally and people who haven’t used credit at all recently.

Other notable VantageScore 3.0 credit score improvements include:

  • Ignoring all paid collections, as well as any collections, paid or unpaid, under $250
  • A new score range of 300 to 850, the same scale used by FICO, making it easier for consumers to interpret and manage their credit scores.
  • Credit relief for disaster victims, by ignoring accounts negatively impacted by natural disasters.

VantageScore score range

Score Range: VantageScore 3.0 credit scores now range from 300 to 850, a numerical scale more familiar to lenders and consumers. Source: www.vantagescore.com

VantageScore Credit Education Tools

Of course, for consumers, credit scores are often only as good as the explanations and underlying credit information provided with them.  The factors affecting your VantageScore credit score are outlined in the graphic below – helping you answer the question “What influences my score?”.

What factors influence your credit score

What Really Matters: The key factors that influence your your VantageScore credit score from your credit report. Not all factors have the same impact on your VantageScore credit score (if one of these categories doesn’t apply to you, the other categories would be adjusted accordingly). Source: www.vantagescore.com

Another tool to help boost your understanding is the reason codes (or score factors) website, which simplifies and translates the codes that appear in your credit report into, get this, plain English.

What Doesn’t Impact My Credit Score?

There are several things don’t factor into the VantageScore model – or any other credit scoring model, for that matter – including race, color, religion, nationality, gender, marital status, age, salary, occupation, employer, employment history, where you live or even your total assets.

A Helpful Credit Management Solution

Currently for consumers, there is a simple, no-cost way to monitor your VantageScore 3.0 score and credit report each month.  Credit.com’s secure and free Credit Report Card includes an easy-to-understand credit profile and the VantageScore 3.0 credit score, plus grades and recommendations that can make managing your credit easy.  In fact, it really couldn’t be much easier.


  • tony

    is vantage 3.0 comparable to a fico score

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      They are different models but the range is the same. If you want to see your VantageScore 3.0 you can get it for free at Credit.com.

    • Dr. Travis J Hedrick

      They are different in many ways, however, they are used for the advantage of the lenders and are biased against consumers by default. Unfortunately, there is not much you can do about this other than maintain a positive flow of credit history to your reports – this will eventually filter to VantageScore and FICO over time.

      Consumers should be able to request that FICO and VantageScore not have access to your information without written consent, but that is not how it works. Your credit score is not really your own!

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    Those scores aren’t very high. You can always get a car loan but you’ll probably pay a higher rate. Do you see the grades for your score and the action plan?

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    One of the reasons we show two different scores is to help raise consumer awareness that you don’t have one score; you have many. In fact, even with FICO scores, there are many different versions and lenders can- and often do – customize them. We encourage consumers not to focus so much on the number as how well they are doing with the different factors that make up their scores. Those tend to be pretty consistent among models. In other words, most models are looking primarily at payment history and debt, and to a lesser extent age of credit history, new credit, inquiries etc.

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    I think the real focus should be on the factors that make up your scores, including payment history, debt and to a lesser extent age of credit history, new credit and inquiries. If you get high grades for all of those your scores should be strong across many different models.

    • Mary Naomi Puanani Rider

      But lenders focus solely on the score. That is all they care about. Consumers are nothing but numbers — we are not people. And why so many different scores and models?? I firmly believe it is a system set up by lenders to benefit only themselves. Nothing at all about any credit scoring model is there to help consumers. Information and advice is different on every website concerning credit scores. It’s confusing. Everyone should use the same model to put everyone on equal footing. I have been extremely stressed over my own credit score. Last summer, some things happened on my life that required to to use more credit than I really wanted to. Because of that, my score plummeted. Now, no matter what I do, my score either drops a few points or remains the same. Pay off a credit card and what happened? My score dropped. Try to find an explanation for that online …. Not only can you not do it, but there is really no one to help you — unless you want to get into something where you have to pay a large sum of money ….

      • http://blog.credit.com/ Kali Geldis

        Hey Mary —

        Here are a few resources that might help answer some of your questions. You’re not alone, many consumers feel like credit scores are unfair or not consumer-friendly. Credit scores were created for lenders to be able to evaluate borrowers systematically, here’s an article that does a good job explaining that:

        http://blog.credit.com/2014/04/are-credit-scores-fair-80872/

        And Gerri Detweiler just wrote a fantastic piece on why a paid-off credit card can hurt your scores, take a look:

        http://blog.credit.com/2015/06/help-i-paid-off-my-credit-card-my-credit-score-dropped-119515/

        Hope this helps answer some of your questions!

        • Mary Naomi Puanani Rider

          I read both articles you recommended. I used to be a teacher. In fact, I taught for 13 years before changing careers. When I taught, I was constantly asked why children were being judged on their state test scores. To me, credit scores are the same thing. State test scores are a blurry snapshot that do not tell the whole story. Reasons for doing well or not doing well matter. They matter a lot. Reasons for having a lower credit score matter, too. I don’t have late payments. I don’t have any collections. My credit score is low because some things happened in my life that caused me to need to use credit in order to stay off government assistance. during that time, I made my payments on time. Now that things are better and I don’t need to use credit to survive without government assistance, I am being punished with higher interest rates and being turned down for consolidation loans. While I did finally find someone to give me that consolidation loan, I’m stuck paying almost 30% interest. Credit scores plummet with bad decisions, mistakes, or any little thing that is negative and they creep back up or roller coaster when you try to fix things. That is not fair. I know the article said to look at things from a lender’s point of view. Perhaps there should be a “Lender Score” so they can also be judges on a blurry snapshot that does not tell the whole story. For example, when I opened a savings account that was supposed to be attached to my checking account, but the person setting up my account forgot to hit a button. I didn’t know this until after a fee was charged. Granted the fee was reversed and my accounts were connected as they should have been in the first place. Perhaps that small mistake should have put a ding in their “lender score” of say 20 points and fixing their mistakewould then bring it up say 2 points. That is, in a nutshell, how I understand credit scores to work. Add to the confusion that there are, as the article referenced states, many different models. No wonder nothing makes sense. I wish I could win the lottery. If I won big, I’d pay cash for absolutely everything and not ever borrow again — for anything. Then I would no longer have to feel like a victim of the credit system.

      • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

        Mary Naomi – We wrote a new article about paying off a credit card and seeing your score drop. I hope you’ll find it helpful:
        Help! I Paid Off My Credit Card & My Credit Score Dropped

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    The score that we show to consumers is a score that was developed for lenders and is sold to lenders. But, like you, we recognize that there are lots of different scores out there and so we don’t want consumers to focus just on a number. That’s one reason why we show them two scores (the other is VantageScore 3). And we encourage consumers to focus on the five main factors that make up their score, and the grades they are earning for each of those. Generally if your payment history and debt are strong in one credit scoring model they should be strong in most others. We wrote more about that here: What Is a Good Credit Score? Thanks for commenting!

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    The scores the auto lenders use may be different so it’s hard to judge just by those numbers. But it sounds like you won’t be in the top tier, but you should be able to get a decent loan provided you qualify otherwise (debt, income etc.) Rather than let a dealer shop your application and create a bunch of inquiries, why don’t you try to get preapproved for a car loan through a credit union or local bank?

  • shelly

    So does this mean if you have an item in collection that is under 250 and you pay it, is can be erase and help your credit

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      No. A paid collection will not automatically be erased from your credit report, regardless of the balance.

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    I am not sure what you mean by penalized. You don’t get “penalized” just because you paid off your mortgage. However, if is helpful to have open active accounts, though credit cards can work in that regard.

    • notinthematrix

      Yes, Kitten does in fact mean penalized. I have gotten explanations as to why credit score wasn’t higher, and one of the reasons why was “too few active mortgage accounts.” The implication here is that if you pay off your mortgage, your score will be lower than if you didn’t pay it off.

      • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

        Working on an article on this – thanks for bringing it up!

      • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

        Thanks for these questions – very helpful. I wrote this article as a result: Could Paying Off Your Mortgage Hurt Your Credit?

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    Are you talking about your free score from Credit.com?

  • Help

    I have a high credit score(795 from experian) but cannot get approved for a card due to “not enough account information”. What does this mean and what can I do

    • http://www.credit.com/ Credit.com Credit Experts

      It means that there is little in your file, and that the creditor didn’t feel there was enough to make a solid judgment about your creditworthiness. You can do a couple of things. One is to get a “credit builder” loan from a credit union. Another is to get a secured card, which, as its name implies, is secured by a deposit. Essentially, your credit limit is the amount on deposit. (Even so, you’ll want to keep your spending at 30% of your limit or less, and pay it off in full every month.) Here’s more information that might be useful:
      How to Build Credit the Smart Way
      How to Get a Credit Card With No Credit History
      How Secured Cards Help Build Credit

    • Dr. Travis J Hedrick

      Go to your bank or a credit union and take out a secured credit card to help establish more credit and history.

      Secured cards are good for those who do not want the risk of more credit than they can pay for, could close/payoff if they got into a financial dilemma (not recommended closing new credit accounts), and still have regular reporting to credit bureaus.

      You need more credit history, even with such a good score!

      • SteveNSac

        One big difference between applying for a secured “credit” card as opposed to a secured “debit” card is the t debit accounts do no report to the credit bureaus, therefor they will not influence your overall scores.

        • MedX172

          That’s actually not correct. Wells Fargo offers a secured credit card, as do most major banking institutions and they report every month. There’s also no direct indication on the CR that the card is “secured” in your credit file.

  • sampsta .

    So when I log in it tells me my score is 640 but the vantage is 668…what does that mean and why is it different ?

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      There are two different credit scoring models being shown. Focus on where you stand in comparison to other consumers and what you can do to build better credit.

  • Rosa Caraballo

    Hi, I am trying to obtain a personal loan to consolidate and pay off certain cards. I pay on time. After my divorce I had join accts, with the ex and he went without telling and negotiated with creditors to pay off debts at a low interest which he did. My mortgage interesr rate is 7.75% and I can’ find or know what to do anymore. Please advise

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      Rosa – Have you talked with a credit counseling agency? That would be my suggestion for you. Learn more here: Does Credit Counseling Work?

  • Kelvin

    When I pulled my vontage score its 737 but Fico score 699 which one dose creditor look at

    • http://www.credit.com/ Credit.com Credit Experts

      Different creditors choose different scores to look at. FICO is most commonly used, but even FICO has different models and different score ranges. We wrote about it here: Why Do I Have So Many Credit Scores?

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    Rick – Please reach out to customer support through the dashboard and they’ll be happy to take a look at your situation.

  • Dr. Travis J Hedrick

    These numbers show how skewed credit scores really are.

    The VantageScore is a merging of your 3 credit scores into a single number based on their own biased rating system. It is similar to the FICO score, which while used by most lenders, is very biased and not meant to be helpful to individuals but favors lenders.

    Based on your numbers you posted, you have serious discrepancies between your 3 bureau reports! You need to request a free copy of your reports from the bureaus and find out what is wrong. Pay off any legitimate old debt, stop asking for credit (hard inquiries), and challenge anything that is wrong.

    Hope this helps!

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      Just to clarify, VantageScore does not merge information or scores from different bureaus. It is designed to be consistent across the bureaus but it is still based on the information from one of the three major credit reporting agencies, not all three.

    • King of Credit Scoring

      This is bad information. The Vantage Scoring system was designed in part by the 3 bureaus for a different scoring model than FICO in part to help put a score on people with limited or newer credit files. The score is not a merged score for all three bureaus as each bureau has it’s own vantage score profile.
      You shouldn’t post answers to people that are looking for help if you have no idea what you are talking about…..

  • David

    Is my credit score based on just the fact I went bankrupt or who I bankrupt with as well. Credit.com is giving me an F in Payment history even though I have build credit with no discrepancies since then. It’s as if the focus is on who I went bankrupt with not my actual bankruptcy.

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      David – I don’t understand your question. What do you mean about who you went bankrupt with? The credit score is based only on your credit information–not someone else’s. Feel free to clarify your question if I am not answering it.

  • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

    Everything counts but you’re right: once the individual derogatory items are removed you may see your credit scores improve provided you’ve been rebuilding credit. The bankruptcy will be older, and while it will still affect your scores, it probably won’t be as negative as the cumulative amount of negative information there now.

  • tamara

    My credit I realize is still very poor from issues from 2006-2009. it has always been that credit drops off after 7 years. is that from date it opened? date it was first reported? and what of the “sold” collection accounts? they are from things that should be gone but they were bought and were just listed as collection on my report as recently as a year ago although the actual account was 7+ years. My recent credit is spot on but when will these old accounts drop off and will the newly bought collection accounts start the 7 year drop process all over again?

    • http://www.credit.com/ Credit.com Credit Experts

      Tamara —
      Original accounts drop off your report 7 years after they were first reported late. Collections accounts are supposed to drop off the report 7 years and 180 days after the original account went late (assuming no payment activity). Reselling a collection account should not reset the clock. You can read more here: Does Your Old Debt Have an Expiration Date?

  • paco

    Good advice.

  • H Gilbert

    My score is 726 which seems low to me. I consider myself and excellent credit risk. Is 726 low?

    • http://www.Credit.com/ Gerri Detweiler

      It depends on which version of VantageScore you are looking at. V2 runs on a scale that goes up to 990 while version 3 runs up to 850. So a 726 on VantageScore 3 would be higher than on VantageScore 2.

      If you have your free credit score from Credit.com you should see a scale below the number that looks like a thermometer. It will tell you whether you fall in the excellent, good or fair category.

  • Sandibeach22

    Most prime lenders will give you your fico score for free. I can get all 3 from them. Different cards offer different scores. And they are pretty much the same as the vantage score seen here. I did go on an app spree in Nov. so my score dropped but is working it’s way back up. Looks like most lenders pull Equifax since it has most of the inquiries & now is the lowest of my scores. The 750’s & 760’s will get you just about anything you want. That 100k in CL’s you have will keep you from getting above 9%. I’m aiming at 150k just to be sure. And it was a long road to travel. Only time & smart choices can get you there.


Sign up for your free Credit.com account. Learn More
  • Stay Connected to Our Experts

    Please submit your email address to get credit & money tips & advice
    from our team of 50+ experts, delivered weekly to your inbox.
X

Check Your Credit For FREE

Free Credit ScoreGet a FREE personalized credit check-up today.

Get Started – It’s Free!