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How to Dispute an Error on Your Credit Report

Advertiser Disclosure by Kali Geldis

Dispute Error on Credit Report

Finding an error on your credit report isn’t an uncommon experience. In fact, a 2012 study from the Federal Trade Commission found that one in five Americans had an error on their credit reports.

While some of those errors are innocuous — a misspelled name, perhaps, or an old address — others can kill your credit score, potentially costing you tens of thousands of dollars over your lifetime in higher interest rates, upfront deposits and increased insurance premiums.

But the law is on your side. Credit bureaus have a responsibility to provide accurate information about consumers, and are required to have a dispute process so consumers can get their credit reports fixed. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, if you dispute an item on your credit report and the credit reporting agency cannot verify the item’s accuracy or if the item is proven to be inaccurate, the item must be removed from your credit report 30 days after the dispute has been received by the bureau.

Here are your options for disputing an error on your credit report.

How to Find Out If You Have Derogatory Marks on Your Credit Report

Before you can fix the problem, you need to know what the problem is. You can either do this on your own, or hire a credit repair company to manage the process for you. Read this to learn how credit repair works.

You can get free copies of your credit reports once a year at AnnualCreditReport.com. Be sure to pull your reports from each of the major credit reporting agencies — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. An error can exist on one report and not on the other two, and you never know which credit report will be used in a lending decision, so it’s important to make sure all three reports are accurate.

Go through every section of each of your credit reports with a fine-tooth comb — there will likely be a lot of information there. If you see any accounts you don’t recognize or late payments you think were on time, highlight them. You’ll need to dispute each of those separately with the credit bureau who issued that report. Even if the same error appears on all three of your credit reports, you’ll need to file three separate disputes over the item.

You can’t make a blanket dispute claim for everything that’s wrong on your report. Say, for example, that you have two collection accounts you want to dispute on the same credit report — you’ll need to file two separate disputes. However, if the disputes are for the same account — two late payments on your mortgage, for example — you only need to file one dispute, but you need to specify that you want both of the late payments removed.

When you finish your credit report investigation, take stock of all the disputes you need to file. Depending on the number of inaccuracies on your credit report, the dispute process can be cumbersome. Next up: How to actually get the items removed from your credit.

Steps to Remove Negative Items From Your Credit

The dispute process can be done online or via the mail with each of the credit reporting agencies. You are now able to upload supporting documentation to each of the credit bureaus to challenge an error, but you can also include that information in your snail mail letter if you decide to do so.

If sending your dispute by mail…

  • Write a dispute letter. (We’ll explain more on that in the next section.)
  • Send it via certified mail so you can track when it was received.
  • Include copies of any supporting documentation. Do not send originals!
  • You will hear back from the bureau regarding your dispute via U.S. mail, possibly after the 30-day window depending on how long it takes the letter to arrive at your address.

If sending your dispute online via one of the credit bureau portals…

  • You don’t need to write a formal letter, but you will need explain what the error is and where it appears on your report.
  • You can submit it instantly to the bureau and can check the progress of your dispute online via a dispute portal.
  • The bureaus allow you to upload supporting documentation, which some people may prefer for security reasons versus sending sensitive information through the mail.
  • You will be notified of the results via email.

A key part of the dispute is your evidence that the account information is wrong. The more evidence you have, the better your case may be. In some cases, it can be hard to determine what kinds of evidence are needed. For example, an identity theft victim may not know what they need to provide to show they didn’t open an account in their name. After all, they never signed up for it!

This is where many people opt to hit the “easy button” on their credit dispute process. You can hire a credit repair company to represent you on your behalf to the credit bureaus for a fee. A good credit repair company will explain exactly what it can and cannot do on your behalf, will never guarantee a “100-point rise in your credit score” (this is illegal, in fact), and will never ask for payment until after you’ve received services from them. Credit repair companies can be especially helpful if you have many errors on your credit report or have situations like a major identity theft issue or a divorce decree that potentially require more explanation and expertise to dispute. But some people just don’t have the time to go through the whole dispute process and want it done for them instead.

[CREDIT REPAIR HELP: If you need help fixing your credit but don’t want to go it alone, our partner, Lexington Law, can manage the credit repair process for you. Learn more about them here or call them at (844)346-3295 for a free consultation.]

How to Write an Effective Dispute Letter

If you want to take a DIY approach to credit repair, there are a few things you should remember when writing a dispute letter.

  • Be clear and concise. A credit bureau is concerned about accuracy, so pinpoint exactly what is inaccurate (the date of the inaccuracy, the account in question, the lender, etc.).
  • Don’t quote federal laws. Writing that you want to initiate a dispute is sufficient enough. Credit bureaus know these laws already.
  • Include your return address so your results can be sent to the right place.

Here’s a sample letter you can use to write your disputes:

Jane Q. Consumer

123 Main Street

Mainstreet, USA 12345

SSN: xxx-xx-1234

January 30, 2016

Ref #: 000-111-2222

To Whom It May Concern:

I would like to dispute the following item on my credit report:

Wall Street Mortgage Co.

Partial account number 7890.

Opened 05/1999

My credit report shows a 30-day late payment in the amount of $781.32 for April 2013. However, I was not late. I have enclosed copies of my statements for April, May and June 2013 that together clearly show my payment for April was not 30 days late.

Please correct this as soon as possible. Thank you,

Jane Q. Consumer

Jane Q. Consumer


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  • Meet Our Expert

    kali_geldis GravatarKali Geldis is Credit.com's Editorial Director. She writes about a wide range of personal finance and credit topics. She previously ran MainStreet, the personal finance website powered by TheStreet. She has also worked for The Wall Street Journal as a Dow Jones Newspaper Fund intern and at The Huntington Herald-Dispatch as a reporter.
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